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Fiji Currency

What currency is used in Fiji?

The Fijian Dollar (FJD, FJ$, $) is Fiji’s official currency, made up of 100 cents. First in circulation between 1867 and 1873, the Fijian Dollar was reintroduced on 15 January 1969 to replace the Fijian Pound at a rate of 1 pound being equal to 2 dollars.

Exchanges and Preferred Payment Methods
In addition to exchange booths in airports, ferry ports and tourist areas, Australian dollars can also be exchanged for Fijian dollars at most hotels. However, hotels do generally have a cashless policy preferring amounts to be charged back or paid for electronically. Major bank and credit cards are widely accepted in Fiji; however, cash is the preferred payment method when shopping at the local markets and the correct amount is appreciated.

Monetary Regulations
It is important to note there is a limit per adult of FJ$10,000 cash that may be brought into Fiji. It is also recommended the amount you take home with you does not exceed the amount brought in.

Denominations
Current Fijian Dollar denominations include 5c, 10c, 20c and 50c (all three ply nickel-clad steel), $1 and $2 coins (both made of three ply nickel-clad brass) as well as $5 (brown), $10 (purple), $20 (blue), $50 (red) and $100 (yellow) notes. Each note increases slightly in width as its value increases.

In 2013, Fiji introduced a new family of coins, which included the $2 coin for the first time. Coins from this release feature a range of flora and fauna themes without the Queen’s portrait, due to Fiji’s suspension from the Commonwealth in 2016. Despite being reinstated to the Commonwealth in 2014, it is unlikely the Queen will be featured again on Fiji currency. Current cent coins depict Nuqa-roro (Foxface Rabbitfish), Lali (Drum), Beka-Mirimiri (Fiji Flying Fox), I ulã tavatava (Throwing club), Kakã (Kadavu Shining Parrot), Tabua (Whale’s tooth), Varivoce (Humphead Wrasse) and Camakau (Traditional outrigger canoe). Current dollar coins depict Vokai (Banded Iguana), Saqãmoli (Drinking vessel), Ga ni Vatu (Peregrine Falcon) and Tanoa (Kava bowl).

A 2012 series of notes were also first issued in 2013. In addition to flora and fauna, the notes also feature a number of places and industries of Fijian significance, including Katoni Masima; domodomo (canoe masthead) as registration device, parrot, Mount Valili, Fiji Crested Iguana, Balaka palm, Masiratu flower, i Buburau ni Bete, Beli fish; Joske’s Thumb; Grand Pacific Hotel, Foa, Macgillvray storm bird, fish processing; cutting lumber; mining; train; Mount Uluinabukelevu, Wasekaseka, Tagimoucia flower; ceremonial presentation of Tabua and Yaqona, Buli Kula, Nanai (Fiji cicada), map of Fiji and tourism. Each note also features a watermark of a Fijian head and its value.

Fun Fact
Fiji has a $7 dollar note, which was released in 2017. The commemorative banknote celebrates Fiji Rugby 7s Gold Medal win at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, the country’s first ever Olympic Medal.
Blue in colour to reflect the Fijian flag, the front of the note is a unique vertical orientation to depict the 2016 Fijian Olympic team’s flag bearer and Fiji Rugby 7s Captain, Mr Osea Kolinisau OF. Along with the Fijian Coat of Arms and signature of the Governor of the Reserve Bank of Fiji, the note also features a smaller image of Fiji Rugby 7s Olympic Coach, Mr Ben Ryan CF, sitting on the Sigatoka Sand Dunes. The reverse of the note is horizontal and shows the Fiji Rugby 7s Gold Olympians with the Prime Minister of Fiji, Hon. Josaia Voreqe Bainimarama and team officials.

When placed under an ultraviolet light, the gold medals around the players necks and the RBF logo change to fluorescent green.

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